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Mankind’s Debt to the Prophet Mohammad

This book “Mankind’s Debt To The Prophet Mohammad” is a public lecture given on Tuesday 22 August 1989 at the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies.A short throughly refrenced work, highlighting the lasting impact of the Prophet (saw), upon every society and culture of man.In certain parts of the world, people enjoy freedom of conscience and […]

  • S. Abul Hasan Ali Nadwi
  • 1-871163-02-1
  • Oxford Cenrre for Islamic Studies
Mankind’s Debt to the Prophet Mohammad
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Mankind’s Debt to the Prophet Mohammad
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    This book “Mankind’s Debt To The Prophet Mohammad” is a public lecture given on Tuesday 22 August 1989 at the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies.A short throughly refrenced work, highlighting the lasting impact of the Prophet (saw), upon every society and culture of man.In certain parts of the world, people enjoy freedom of conscience and choice, are free to lead their lives in peace and amity, to devote their energies to teaching and preaching, researching and making new discoveries. Yet even these parts of the world have not always been so tolerant, nor free from strife, nor disposed towards the coexistence of different peoples, sects and groups, still less sufficiently broad-minded, to accommodate differences of opinion.Mankind has seemed, many times, to be bent upon self-destruction, and passed through stages when, by its own misdeeds, it has forfeited any right to survival. Men have sometimes behaved like crazed and ferocious beasts, flinging all culture and civilization, arts, literature, decency, the canons of moral and civil law, to the winds.All of us know that the writing of history is of a relatively recent origin. The ‘prehistoric’ era was very much longer. The decline of mankind when it relapsed into savagery was by no means an agreeable task for historians and writers to record. Nevertheless, we do find narratives of the downfall of empires and the decay of human society, told at long intervals in the pages of history. The first of these date from the fifty century A.D. some are briefly touched and upon here.

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    • S. Abul Hasan Ali Nadwi
    • 1-871163-02-1
    • Oxford Cenrre for Islamic Studies
    • 1989
    • Britain
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